Botox without needles

by Mark Gray August 18, 2016

Since Botox emerged as a cosmetic treatment in the 1990s, people have been trying to find a way to deliver its wrinkle-eliminating effects without the need for needles. 

That dream may soon be achieved. 

Botox-maker Allergan has spent $90 million to acquire Anterios, a biotech firm that’s developing a topical formulation of the botulinum toxin. 

Anterios specializes in botulinum toxin-based prescription drugs and has developed technology for the delivery of Botox and other neurotoxins through the skin. 

You’ll still need the services of a qualified practitioner to administer the cream – botulinum is a nerve toxin and needs to be carefully controlled. But needlephobics will be able to get their Botox dose in the form of a lotion instead of flinching as a tiny needle is poked into their crows’ feet.




Mark Gray
Mark Gray

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